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Homemade Venison British Bangers (Sausages)

One sausage link laying on a bed of mashed potatoes, smothered with brown onion gravy and a pile of green peas on a white plate.

How to Make Venison British Bangers

You do not need to be an expert to make your own Homemade British Bangers or other sausages in general. You just need some equipment, the venison, some pork backfat, a few other ingredients and some patience.  

Why do they call these British Style Sausages Bangers?

You can read more about that here along with some other dishes to serve alongside your amazing Homemade Venison British Bangers. 

What goes great with Bangers?

Bangers and Mash are a very common British meal, and Onion Gravy  is a must in our house along with a Simple Fried Purple Cabbage or some nice green peas (mushy peas or other wise)

Fried red cabbage in a skillet with a nutcracker that looks like a chef in the foreground.
Dark brown gravy and onions simmering in a skillet and being stirred with a white rubber whisk.
Whipping mashed potatoes with a hand mixer in a grey saucepan. There's a nutcracker who looks like a chef in the foreground.
Pepé is quite happy with the texture of these mashed potatoes. They are perfectly fluffy and buttery.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Freeze all your grinder parts for at least 20 minutes before you begin (grinding plates, blades, tray and the bowl that will receive the ground meat).

Several large pieces of dark red deer meat on a white cutting board, removing silver skin. There's a nutcracker in the foreground who looks like a chef.
Pepé is not happy, but we have to remove all this silver skin from the venison before we make British style bangers (sausages).
Grey meat grinder, with two bowls of meat in the foreground and a nutcracker who looks like a chef.

Prepare your hog casings by soaking in some cold water to remove the salt. *see package instructions. I replaced the water three times. Be careful not to pour your hog casings out with the salty water, they are very slippery. 

Hog casings in a rectangular dish with water and the package they came in.

Make sure your meat is very cold. You can freeze this for about 20 minutes before starting as well. Cut chilled meat into large cubes (about 1-2 inches/2.5-5cm) making sure they will fit through the feeding tube on your meat grinder. 

Venison and pork chunks in the tray of a meat grinder. Ground meat coming out the front. There's a nutcracker standing next to it that looks like a chef.

Grind both the venison and pork fat together using the course grind plate. You may want to chill it again for 20 minutes, then grind again on finer grind plate. If needed, chill again for 20-30 minutes before next step. 

Mixing in the Seasoning

10 small square white ramekins with various spices and herbs in each.
Two hands wearing white latex gloves mixing ground meat in a very large white plastic bowl.

Mix the prepared meat with all of the remaining ingredients except the hog casings. I use my hands just like when I make meatloaf. And yes, you may need to chill it again. Everything needs to be kept cold. Not frozen, but cold. 

Stuffing the Casings

Take the blade out of the grinder, and assemble the medium size funnel/tube. Load one casing onto this like a pair of socks with a big hole at the end. Note, do not tie it off at this point.

Start feeding the meat mixture until you see it at the opening of the tube. At this point, tie it off with twine, or with itself and continue feeding. I do this because if you tie it off before you start to feed, it creates a big air bubble at the end. Continue stuffing, being careful not to stuff too tightly or it will burst, until you reach the last couple inches of casing. Tie it off, add another casing and repeat process.

Coil of uncooked Venison sausage.
Hands twisting sausages into links.

Once done stuffing all the casings, pinch sausage at around 4 inches from one end to create a separation point and twist a few times, repeat this all the way to the end, twisting in opposite directions for each twist. 

Pierce any air pockets with a sterile needle, sausage pricker or a toothpick. Hang the bangers, or lay on a tray overnight in the refrigerator to let the flavors develop. 

Coiled links of uncooked Homemade Venison British Bangers.

How to Cook

Four plum sausages browning in a skillet. There's a nutcracker in the foreground who looks like a chef.

Heat a tablespoon or two of oil on medium/high in a large skillet and cook sausages for 5-8 minutes per side. Once browned, put enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, and put the lid on. The steam will continue to cook them and keep the moisture in the bangers as well as help prevent them from burning. Or roast sausages at 400°F/205°C for 10 minutes each side or until done. They are done when internal temperature is 160°F/72°C.

One sausage link laying on a bed of mashed potatoes, smothered with brown onion gravy and a pile of green peas on a white plate. There's a nutcracker in the foreground who looks like a chef.

Homemade Venison British Bangers (Sausages)

Stacey Mincoff
Course Dinner
Cuisine British, Irish
Servings 36 Sausages
Calories 248 kcal

Equipment

  • Meat Grinder with Sausage Stuffer

Ingredients
 
 

  • 4.5 Pounds Venison
  • 1.5 Pounds Pork Fat also known as backfat
  • 1 Teaspoon Nutmeg ground
  • 1.5 Teaspoons Mace ground
  • 2 Teaspoons Onion Powder
  • 2 Teaspoons Garlic Powder
  • 1.5 Tablespoons White Pepper ground
  • 1.5 Tablespoons Rubbed Sage
  • 2 Teaspoons Ginger dried, ground
  • 2.5 Tablespoons Kosher Salt
  • 2 Teaspoons Umami Seasoning or mushroom powder optional
  • 12 Ounces Beer I used a nice lager with flavor
  • 2 Teaspoons Dried Thyme
  • 1.25 Cups Sourdough Bread Crumbs or bread crumbs of choice, toasted or dried out over night
  • 15-20 Feet Natural Hog Casings 457-610cm

Instructions
 

  • Freeze all your grinder parts for at least 20 minutes before you begin (grinding plates, blades, tray and the bowl that will receive the ground meat). Prepare your hog casings by soaking in some cold water to remove the salt. *see package instructions. I replaced the water three times. Be careful not to pour your hog casings out with the salty water, they are very slippery.
  • Make sure your meat is very cold. You can freeze this for about 20 minutes before starting as well. Cut chilled meat into large cubes (about 1-2 inches/2.5-5cm) making sure they will fit through the feeding tube on the meat grinder.
  • Grind both venison and pork fat together using the course grind plate. You may want to chill it again for 20 minutes, then grind again on finer grind plate. If needed, chill again for 20-30 minutes before next step.
  • Mix the prepared meat with all of the remaining ingredients except the hog casings. I use my hands just like when I make meatloaf. And yes, you may need to chill it again. Everything needs to be kept cold. Not frozen, but cold.

Stuffing the Casings

  • Take the blade out of the grinder, and assemble the medium size funnel/tube. Load one casing onto this like a pair of socks with a big hole at the end, do not tie it off at this point. Start feeding the meat mixture until you see it at the opening of the tube. Now tie it off with twine, or with itself and continue feeding. I do this because if you tie it off before you start to feed, it creates a big air bubble at the end. Continue stuffing, being careful not to stuff too tightly or it will burst (see video where it bursts above), until you reach the last couple inches of casing then tie it off. Load another casing onto the stuffing funnel and repeat process.
  • Once done stuffing all the casings, pinch sausage at around 4 inches from one end to create a separation point and twist a few times, repeat this all the way to the end, twisting in opposite directions for each twist.
  • Pierce any air pockets with a sterile needle, sausage pricker or a toothpick. Hang the bangers, or lay on a tray overnight in the refrigerator to let the flavors develop.

How to cook Banger Sausages:

  • Heat a tablespoon or two of oil on medium/high in a large skillet and cook sausages for 5-8 minutes per side. Once browned, put enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, and put the lid on. The steam will continue to cook them and keep the moisture in the bangers as well as help prevent them from burning. Or roast sausages at 400°F/205°C for 10 minutes each side or until done. They are done when internal temperature is 160°F/72°C.

Notes

If you over stuff and a casing breaks, just cut the casing at that point, squeeze an inch or two of the meat out and tie it off. Start again.
I do not recommend a plastic meat grinder for large quantities. 

Nutrition

Calories: 248kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 13gFat: 20gSaturated Fat: 8gCholesterol: 66mgSodium: 519mgPotassium: 187mgFiber: 1gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 8IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 8mgIron: 2mg
Keyword Bangers, Charcuterie, Sausage makeing, Venison, Wild Game
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
What Type of Equipment Will You Need to Make these Sausages?

Some sort of meat grinder. There are Manual Meat Grinders, and there are Electric Meat Grinders. Typically the manual grinders are cheaper, and some will come with the sausage stuffer tubes, which you will also need. KitchenAid even has a meat grinder attachment If your grinder does not come with a sausage stuffer, you will need one of those too. Here are some Manual Sausage Stuffers, and some people actually prefer them over electric. 

What Type of Casing for Stuffing British Bangers? 

You will need Natural Hog Casings to stuff them in and some butcher’s or kitchen twine. 

How to cook Banger Sausages?

Heat a tablespoon or two of oil on medium/high in a large skillet and cook sausages for 5-8 minutes per side. Once browned, put enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, and put the lid on. The steam will continue to cook them and keep the moisture in the bangers as well as help prevent them from burning. Or roast sausages at 400°F/205°C for 10 minutes each side or until done. They are done when internal temperature is 160°F/72°C.


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